About the Comparative Celtic Lexicon

table of contents

  1. What is a Talking Dictionary?
  2. Semantic Domains
    1. Buildings
    2. Trades
    3. Farm
    4. Animals
    5. Birds
    6. Colors
    7. Numbers
    8. Family
    9. Plants
    10. Trees
    11. Verbs
    12. People
    13. Food
    14. Water
    15. Conflict
    16. Nature
    17. Body parts and the Body
    18. Attributes
    19. Grammar
    20. Home
    21. Measures
    22. School
    23. Time
    24. Town
    25. Weather
    26. Abstract
    27. Man-made
    28. Tools
    29. Spatial words
    30. Speech and stories
    31. Health and sickness
    32. Emotions and feelings
  3. Other Interesting Things to Note
    1. Object Incorporation

Some basic tips

Searching for a series of words will only return entries containing the entire string of words. Simply put, a search is assumed to be quoted. Ex. inputting the phrase: bird or fowl, will only return entries containing the entire phrase “bird or fowl”. However, an asterisk (*) can be used as a wildcard, matching anything. Ex. bird* would return all entries containing the phrase “bird or fowl” as well as “swallow (bird)”, and anything else containing “bird”.

Users can search:

Searching with “entire dictionary” selected yields entries containing the searched string of words in either the Celtic headwords or the English headwords portions of entries.

Searching with “Celtic headwords” selected allows users to search the Lexicon in Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Breton, Manx, and Cornish.

Searching with “English headwords” selected allows users to search the Lexicon in English, calling up corresponding Celtic words.

Searching with “French headwords” selected allows users to search the Lexicon in French, calling up corresponding Celtic words.

Searching with “Celtic pronunciation” selected allows users to search the Lexicon by pronunciation, calling up entries with the search string of words in International Phonetic Alphabet notation.

Searching with “semantic domain” selected allows users to search for broader categories (ex. birds) as well as individual items or concepts (ex. starling) within a given semantic domain.

The semantic domains employed in the Comparative Celtic Lexicon are:

Buildings

Included in this category are:

Trades

Included:

Farm

Includes:

Animals

Includes:

Birds

These words are all cross-listed with animals.

Includes types of birds (eagle, swallow, hen). Also includes nest and egg.

Colors

These words are all cross-listed with attributes.

Includes colors (black, white, blue) and patterns (speckled).

Numbers

Includes cardinal numbers (six, ten, three) and ordinal numbers (sixth, tenth, third)

Family

These words are all cross-listed with people.

Includes words for members of a family (sister, son-in-law, wife, son).

Plants

Includes:

Trees

These words are all cross-listed with plants. Includes:

Verbs

Includes all verbs (to write, to cry).

People

Includes:

Food

Includes:

Water

Includes:

Conflict

Includes:

Nature

Body parts and the Body

Refers only to the human body. Includes:

Attributes

Includes all adjectives or descriptive terms (full, dirty, royal). Includes colors.

Grammar

Includes:

Home

Includes:

Measures

Includes:

School

Includes:

Time

Includes:

Town

Includes:

Weather

Includes:

Abstract

Includes items or actions that lack any physical referent (mercy).

Man-made

Includes any object that is not naturally occurring (wheelbarrow, house).

Tools

Includes any man-made object that is used to make something else (anvil, spit, forge) or to perform a task (wheelbarrow, fishing net)

Spatial words

Includes:

Speech and stories

Includes:

Health and sickness

Includes:

Emotions and feelings

Includes:

Other Interesting Things to Note

Object Incorporation

We hope this guide helps you get to know the dictionary a little better, and that you have fun exploring the many fascinating things it holds!

Email questions, comments, or feedback to harrison@swarthmore.edu. Thank you for visiting!